Canis through the peep-hole

The Canis Lupus  had been domesticated thousands of years ago, precisely how these animals were broken-in remains a mystery.   Archaeological and genetic evidence traces the practice of domestication back some 33,000 years.  The most popular theories are:  [1]Orphaned Wolf-cubs  and [2]Comfort Enticement (Food/Shelter ).    Experiments have been conducted to test these theories with other animals to determine the animal’s relationship with humans after a few generations [see: Belyaev Experiments].    Domesticated foxes lose luster in their coats after a few generations but gain an empathic relationship with their human care-givers.    While this information may be disappointing to furriers, promising to the theory of domestication.

Caninus in Latin, means “of the dog,” the term had been applied to several species of animals with specific attributes, specifically the teeth and the way it would hunt and kill prey.  Canidae encapsulates many animals that would not be considered true dogs (such as prairie dogs, and foxes).  What makes a true dog, is the domestication, i.e. you wouldn’t have a fox or a prairie dog in your household .    Today’s domestic dogs still carry behavioral traits of their ancestors.    Even if a dog has been taken from a breeding kennel to a home, its instinct is to operate as a pack animal.  Human companions become a surrogate pack.   If given opportunity, the animal would seek out ‘familiars’ in the wild.    It’s among the reasons the modern dog is classified as Canis lupus familiaris; a direct ancestor of the domesticated Grey Wolf.     As recently as 1993, the Smithsonian reclassified the subspecies and all previous references to C. Domesticus were rendered archaic.

A few years ago I became fascinated with Feral Children.  There have been several cases in which a feral child had been taken into the pack by domesticated dogs.  The dogs recognized a small defenseless child as a familiar, not prey to otherwise starving animals.  Unlike so many other species of animals, the pack animal senses something familiar.

In the 21st century, the case of Andrei Tolstyk gained much attention.  The child was thought to have been abandoned at 3 months old, having been born with hearing and speech problems (though no details have been released as to how this was determined early on), and had been cared for by the family dog.   The child wasn’t discovered until age seven  by Social Workers.  It’s  mind boggling to many to imagine how a single dog took on the responsibility of surrogate parent to a human child for so long, with not much to work with but a shelter.    Every basic need would have to be managed by the dog until the child was physically developed to move about on his own.    Like other Feral Children that miss the markers for language (thought to be between the age of 0-4 years old), his brain will not likely develop this ability and he will have to rely on his innate animal instincts to survive.  He will bond with a pack, he will use his body language, and integrate as best he can with what he’s got to work with.  Just as modern dogs can be taught to communicate, have their behaviors conditioned and perform for their care-givers so too can domesticated Feral Humans.

feral_intro_0

090515 14 Siena cathedral Romulus and Remus mosaic

The founding of Rome was based in a Feral mythos.  The twins Romulus and Remus had been abandoned as children and a female wolf took them in and they survived by suckling her milk.    Along came a wandering shepherd to discover the great She-wolf Lupa and the children were raised to men on Palatine Hill.  The birth of the Roman Empire hangs from the teet of a wolf.  SPQR [Senatus Populus Que Republicus]!     Long Live the  mytho-memetic historica!  

dscf0321

Augury   from the start of the Roman Empire and was used to determine matters of State.  As such, naturally this would grandfather in the role of the Auger within the Roman class system ( collegium ).    Romulus and Remus would look to the birds to settle the dispute over which hill to build upon.  When each confirmed their own desire, it would then become a battle to the death.   Rome is named after the Alpha dog (Romulus) and serves to reason why the plebs live on the Aventine and gaze at the Palatine through the key-hole.   

dscf0463

You don’t get a foothold on the Palatine by wagging your tail for the Master; this is the domestication of the Canis Lupus.  You go for the throat.  Alphas lead the dog and take control of the Hill.    This is how you build an empire and why the Alphas keep birds in cages.

Sin Jones

Grotto Magazine: Fall Edition

Happiness is of the Devil

What does it mean to be happy?  Do you know?  

What does happiness look like, feel like, and what affect does it have on those around you?

I find that happiness is vilified, and demonized; for if you are happy, people tend to believe that you have some mental condition that you are hiding like sociopathy.   I am happy.  I smile a lot.  When I talk with people, it tends to be contagious.  If you are having a bad day and I enter the atmosphere of your haze and shine a little light into your darkness.  This bothers people.  And I find myself asking: Why?  

Why is it so hard to be happy?

Shit happens.  Get over it.

Shit happens to you, Get over yourself.

Attachment to the events that invoke unhappiness is dwelling in sorrow.  Who the hell wants to be unhappy?  As I look around at many unhappy people, it seems there are lots of people who actually want to be unhappy.  The contentment makes them uneasy, and so they seek an outlet to be unhappy.  It can be anything really, a news report on television, some forum post on the Internet, or even bumping into another unhappy person on your daily travels.    The truth is, many people seek out unhappiness.  Why?

What is it about contentment that makes one so uncomfortable that it leads to belief that: Something is wrong.  Personally, when I feel content, I consider what it is I could be doing to strive for more so that I don’t stagnate in my present level of being.  It doesn’t make me uneasy; instead it just makes me wonder. So, I reflect.  I have a moment of introspect, and think:  Well hey this moment is good, but things could be better.  I take great pride in my personal accomplishments but if you are constantly looking back, rather than forward, you tend to believe that there’s nothing more that can be done.  You’ve done it all.  Nope, there’s always more and life is full of surprises.

I spend a great deal of time considering the possibilities.  I take on challenges as a condition of my being to constantly test what I’m made of.  Some challenges are more difficult than others, and I find the trouble-shooting to be great way to exercise my mind.  My mind…Ah yes… It is always working, and on many levels.  My mind is never really quiet.  It’s on an adventure into the imagination.  That’s where it all begins right?  Imagining.  I can imagine myself being a certain way, or acquiring things, but it can border on setting up expectations.  Generally speaking, when you set up expectations and they are not met, you are left either disappointed or frustrated.  This can lead to being bitter….Unhappy.  There’s also negative identification and imagining.  You gotta stay alert and self-aware at all times.  This takes Work.

All self-created unhappiness should be exorcised.  Is there an Exorcist in the house????  Oh right, I’m one of those too.  A skill one acquires when being of the Devil.  The Devil is always in the details.  The details aren’t always what they seem to the outside world thereby making them Occult.

I am rarely unhappy.  I am ambitious, and enjoy the challenge of daily life.  The years have gone by like a blink.  I’ll be 39 in January, and I can remember 29 like it was yesterday.  When I do look back, I’m looking for apparent changes, or coping tools I’ve employed in the past to see if they are relevant today.  We change, but the more things change the more things seem to stay the same.   I can identify constants in myself that have been tried and found true.  I can also identify when I’m on a Fool’s Journey.  Something needs to happen to knock you off the wheel, so life throws you a curve ball.  The more we accept that we cannot control every aspect of our lives, the less inclined we are to freak out when shit happens.  

I’m a happy person.  It doesn’t mean I don’t have bad days or days when I’m like:  Let the world burn!  About six months ago I was driving down the highway and a construction vehicle dropped a stone as big as my fist out of its cargo and it hit my windshield smashing it.  I chased the truck down for phone number and driver id #, I obtained it.   I pulled over to call the company, left messages, with no reply.  It was made resounding clear, that this is one of those instances when shit happens.  Even if the office had called me back, the burden of proof is on me to demonstrate the cover to the truck was up when ordinance requires that it be down.  This would have prevented the stone from flying out at high speeds and hitting my car.  I had to pay for a broken windshield.  Shit!  So you suck it up, put on your big girl panties and just deal with it.  I got over it.  Three months later, the hatchback handle on my trunk broke off in my hand, and I had to replace the part to open my trunk.  Upon research, it happened to be a fairly common occurrence with the make and model I bought.  Even if I’d known that, I’m fairly certain I still would have made the purchase. I love my car.  So, shit happened.  I got over it.  I fixed it.  A month ago, a small pebble hit my windshield, again on the interstate and now I have a busted windshield again.  Shit happened again.  I got over it.  Shit happened to me, I got over myself.  This time I laughed.  What can you do?  It’s pretty funny.  My little toy car, now 6 years old, appears to be having a moment.  It’s been a pretty dependable car, easy on gas, and packs a lot of cargo for being so small.  I still love my car.  I still remember vividly ordering it online.  The first time I’d ever purchased a car by ordering it on the Internet.  I paid cash.  No car payments.  I customized it the way I wanted it, right down to the shade of paint.  I wanted it and I bought it.  The day I drove it home from the dealership, I was happy.  Driving it around town, I noted that the seething jealousy of the people around me was projected at me.  I laughed.  It was apparent.  By this time, I was on my 3rd new car.  I couldn’t decide on car I really liked.  I went from a sports car, to a PT Cruiser, but still wasn’t quite happy with my purchase.  So, I traded it in, first paying off the car loan, then buying the new one cash.  People asked me: How do you do that!?  Save for it?  Make good financial decisions, and go after what you want?  I mean, it’s just a car right?  Or is it?

It seemed to me that car represented so much more than a vehicle of transportation to others.  Some sort of status or accomplishment.  It’s not as if I purchased a Mercedes or some other ‘status car’, nope.  It was a Scion XB 2005 to be exact.  That’s a pretty cheap car, when compared to other makes and models.  I noted that those projecting their unhappiness at me were driving a beat up shit box.  I’ve had my fair share of those too when I was a teenager.  My first car was a 76’ Pontiac Hurricane, white with olive green interior and it always smelled like maple syrup because it had an antifreeze leak.  My Dad gave it to me, even though I had already purchased my own car, but it needed a clutch.  It was a 69 Mustang Fastback, black with red interior.  I loved that car, but boy did it always give me trouble.  Those jokes about FORD’s are true you know…  Fix Often, Repair Daily!  So I drove the Hurricane around, my girlfriend’s ducking down in the seats because they didn’t want to be seen in this ridiculous hoopty of a car.  I loved it.  I was happy driving it. Thing was a tank, and I could fit 10 kids in the back easily (and often did).  I drove that car until I finally wrecked it when living in NH.  I was t-boned during a rainstorm, and hit a parking-meter.  I never even felt it.  I should have been dead.  The kid that hit me couldn’t see 10’ in front of him has he plowed through the intersection going about 60.  My girlfriend got out of the car and was shaking.  She was on the passenger side that got hit, but she just ended up in my lap on impact.  I made sure she was okay, and she was.  Just a bit shaken.  We are all out there in the pouring rain; the kid is freaked because he doesn’t have insurance.  The car wasn’t even registered in my name.  So I left it there.  It was ready for the junkyard anyway.  I’m smiling, and laughing to myself to which my friend screams: Are you insane we almost died!  I told her “But we didn’t.  Shit happens, get over it.”  She calls me a sociopath in her endearing way, because she’s freaking out and I’m fine.  I thought to myself, Man that was crazy but yay for Pontiac for making such an indestructible car!  She begins worrying about everything under the sun:  What about the car?  Insurance?  Are we going to get in trouble?  Is her mother going to kill her?  All the usual stuff kids worry about I suppose.  I wasn’t worried and that bothered her.  What’s to worry about?  We are alive.  We are fine.  And I have another car to drive, well…After I fixed that clutch that always gave me trouble.  Life was good.  Just another event in the history of SIN JONES.

The car was a fair bit more than just a vehicle for transportation.  Yet another allegory I can pull from my armory.  

To be happy, is to be of the Devil.  To me, that car was a symbol of what could have been if... And the memories I had driving it.  I wasn’t really attached to the car.  I was thankful to my father for giving it to me free and clear.  When I called him to tell him what happened, he was glad I was okay, but then again…He was never worried about me.  He knew I could always take care of myself.  My father always voiced his sense of pride and awe of me.  Our discussion was mostly about old muscle cars, and how they don’t make them like that anymore.  He always had a love for old cars, and it fostered the same love in me.  I still love them but they aren’t always practical.  I had my son at 21, and getting a car seat in and out of my sports car was a pain.  So I traded my love for muscle cars, for something that made better sense.  We sacrifice, but it doesn’t mean we have to sacrifice our happiness.  Especially to those that would do better to see us unhappy.

I’m often vilified for my happy and friendly demeanor.  I mean let’s face it; the stereotype of Satanists is out there!  We are supposed to be brooding, miserable assholes! Life is full of happiness, but shit happens, and you have to get over it.  Otherwise you end up holding that stereotype up with two hands.  How typical and ordinary.  I am neither.

Keep your unhappiness to yourself.

I am of the Devil.

SIN JONES

http://www.the-poison-apple

Be of the Devil

9 Questions for the Devil

 

 

1. What is philosophy?

Philosophy is the Modus operendi for seeking knowledge and truth.  It investigates the nature, causes, and principles of “reality”.  It deduces through logical reasoning, rather than empirical methods.  It is considered a critical analysis of fundamental assumptions and beliefs. 

 

2. What is Idealism?

Idealism is considered a view of the material world as dependent on the mind that perceives it.  It does not deny that material objects exist, but purports that they cannot be known to exist independently of perception of the human mind. 

 

3. What is Materialism?

Materialism or Realism takes the position that nothing exists but the material or real objects/forces that are both perceptible and measurable.  Materialism denies the existence of spirit, soul, and/or mind as a separate type of “reality”.  Many people that consider themselves ‘spiritual’ but not ‘religious’ are in essence rejecting religious dogma, but will more often than not create a more personal dogma which directly affects axiomatic behavioral patterns.  It can be considered ‘religious’ but not ‘religion’ unto itself.

 

 

 

 

 

4. What does it mean to be Spiritual?

Being ‘spiritual’ cannot be defined in absolute terms.  It is often considered to be liberation of the spirit from the material world.  It is not always thus, and extrapolating its meaning will often take philosophical dissection of idealistic individuals.   Liberating oneself from the material may at times involve the use of material objects. 

 

5. What does it mean to be Religious?

Religion is a set of beliefs, practices and ethical behaviors to attain a spiritual goal.  In most cases it is considered to be of a taught personal discipline.  A religion does not always require a spiritual leader, it can be taught to the individual through a collection of sources containing knowledge transferred and processed by the adherent.  The adherent then gains wisdom, truth, and guidance to attain personal fulfillment. 

 

6. What is the Spirit?

The spirit is the primal self, under the layers of personality and biology.  Some conceptualize the spirit as ‘soul’, or ‘essence’.  Conceptual modeling taught, presents an etheric self that can be released from the material body, and ascend to a higher level of existence.  This higher plane is often considered to be a tangible place.  Heaven, Nirvana, Utopia, Cosmic Locale, and/or Dimensional space are common monikers. 

 

7. What is Fundamentalism?

Fundamentalism in the context of attaining a spiritual goal is the strict adherence to the foundation or base of a structured system:  The elementary part of an accepted set of principles.  In physics, the fundamentals are the essential part necessary for the system to work properly.  The same could be applied to the fundamentals of a structured belief system.

 

 

 

 

8.  What is Humanity?

Humanity is the conditional state of being human.  Earlier terms such as Human’ite [1]were used prior to the 15th century, to make the distinction between man and animal, with a strong focus on the human quality to pity.  At that time, pity was used to imply a duty, piety, kindness, and gentleness.  If you were found lacking of these qualities, you were both viewed and treated as less than human.  Humans were considered to be superior in comparison to other species, for an apparent lack of piety and gentleness.  If your deeds were lacking in humanity, you were considered to be of the devil.

 

9.  What does it mean to be of the Devil?

To reject the social standards of humanity and in most cases exceed both humanity and the opposing forces of nature.  Social morality, ethics, and politico are often shirked, rejected and opposed by being of the Devil[2].  As early as the 13th century there is demonstrated evidence of contextual use for trickster archetypes, as well as those deemed sinister.  Local devils were very much a part of many cultures across Europe.  The clever rogue type was most favored and appeared in various tongue-in-cheek contexts, such as card games, art work, and local folklore.  The rogues[3] of the modern era are just as much of the Devil as they had been in our not too distant past.  By the turn of the 16th century, the rogue archetype was often vilified for his efforts, and perceived as a dirty, inhumane thing.  This was necessary in lieu of the time-period and strong focus on humanitarian efforts to puffer one up as righteous, and on the righteous path.  It was also used to create a more civilian imposed effort to root them out of culture entirely[4].  A complacent populace is an obedient populace.

 

 

 

Devil in the details

 

Fiddle with your philosophy, meddle in the spiritual attainment of materialistic acquisition. Do not relent, until the religion of man seeks to fuck with his fundamentalism, force him to exceed his humanity…His condition.  Otherwise, the meek will inherit the earth, and the devils of this time are nothing more than a joke in the footnote of the treatise of control.

 

 

BE of the Devil.

 

 

SIN JONES

The Poison Apple

www.the-poison-apple.com


[1] Old French, in use to denote good breeding, upholding philanthropous values, adherence to duty and being kind.  In heavy use up to the mid-late 14th century. 

[2] Devil, etymological study demonstrates the various uses of this term across Europe and cross-seeded into other nations. 

[3] See:  The Fool by SIN JONES.

[4] See:  Pagan Push, Book of SIN, written by SIN JONES